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Feline Speedsters by Dontknowwhattodraw94 Feline Speedsters by Dontknowwhattodraw94
Done with finals (yaay) and have a few days of nothing at all to do so here's another size chart. 
Some things I'm not entirely sure of so keep reading.

Bullet; Green Cheetah - Acinonyx jubatus

The fastest land animal ever. With a top speed of 98 km/h it surely is a feline speedster. They're easily recognizable by their long legs, slim build and spotted coat unless you're one of those who don't know the difference between a leopard, jaguar and cheetah. No offense of course.
Their build makes it able to reach these speeds in short, massive outbursts they can keep up for a maximum of 450-ish meters before overheating. Because of this they're capable of hunting fast prey like gazelle, but not good fighters which makes it easy for opportunists such as lions, hyenas and leopards to steal their prey. This causes cheetahs to be fast eaters once they've recovered their breath, ignoring the bones and only going for the soft parts. 
Today there's no cat who tries to beat a cheetah when it comes to speed, but others have tried in the past.


Bullet; Green "Giant cheetah" - Acinonyx pardinensis

Better known as the Pleistocene giant cheetah. A huge cat the size of a lion of which fossils have been found from Spain to China. Fossils appear in sediments as early as 3.2 to 2.5 milllion years ago while going extinct during the Middle Pleistocene. It was thought because of its legginess and, because it was so huge, that it could reach similar if not higher speeds than the African cat. 
However, it's not as developed as its today's cousin its bones show and its skull was more intermediate between that of normal cats and cheetahs. However, it was still a fast runner, but because of its larger mass (twice as much as an average cheetah) and not that refined adaptations it was still slower than one. What they do have in common is a dentition that's very similar which shows giant cheetahs were fast eaters that evaded the boney parts of their meal too. Not a surprise in an ecosystem quite similar to that of Africa: cave lions, cave hyenas, jaguars, Homotherium and gray wolves sure were capable of bullying the giant cheetah away from its kill.


Bullet; Green "American steppe cheetah" - Miracinonyx inexpectatus

Around the same time the giant cheetah arose in Eurasia, another cat appeared in North America. 
Often called American cheetah, the genus Miracinonyx isn't a true cheetah. Sure, Acinonyx, Miracinonyx and Puma share indeed a common ancestor and it was indeed thought that the Old World cheetahs were descendants of the American Miracinonyx (back in the day still considered part of Acinonyx), but today we know they're seperate genera and that the similarities between these two fast felines is an amazing case of convergent evolution.
The colour pattern I chose here is something with large spots going from how more basal cats have coats with large spots and puma kittens have pretty large spots too in comparison to those of African cheetahs. However, I forgot to check a phylogenic tree for certainty and looking at it now and seeing how cheetahs are surrounded by cats with not that large spots like fishing cats, Asian jungle cats and lynxes I'm fearing this coat might be a bit unlikely...
Miracinonyx inexpectatus is the species of the genus that looks the most like a cheetah and likely had the same lifestyle on the Pleistocene steppes. The speed of the pronghorn is thought to have evolved because of this cat for example. 
It's the oldest species of the genus of felines and went extinct some 600 000 years ago. It could be it shares a common ancestor with the giant cheetah on the Eurasian or African continent (there are some contenders), but it could be different. 
After its extinction, there's no American cheetah for a few hundred thousand years (no fossils found yet) but there is a possible descendant.

Bullet; Green "American mountain cheetah" - Miracinonyx trumani

The earliest remains found of Miracinonyx trumani are dated at 19 750 years ago +- 650 years bpa. It's proportions are inbetween those of M. inexpectatus and pumas so it'd need a quite rapid evolution. That is, if it was a direct descendant of the former of course. It was also thought pumas too are a descendant of M. inexpectatus, but it's way more likely these two genera simply share a common ancestor.
I'm not entirely sure about the size of M. trumani in this chart, but going from that its legs were shorter and it was a more robust cat than its steppe-dwelling cousin I think I'm not that far off. The colour pattern is inspired on that of puma kittens so it's a plausible one, I think.
Now, about the lifestyle of M. trumani I've found some thoughts about how it could've been more generalistic in its choice of environment than M. inexpectatus based on its anatomy and that there are remains found in a cave in the Grand Canyon in Arizona. It's on this I've made up some common names for the two members of this genus. "American mountain cheetah" was also to show the genus' genetic relationship to mountain lions.




Refs used

- For the giant cheetah: Mauricio Antón's reconstruction
- A. inexpectatus: the skeletal from Van Valkenburg et al. - The Plio-Pleistocene cheetah-like cat Miracinonyx inexpectatus of North America (1990). That skeletal is also visible in the link in the text.
- A. trumani: again Mauricio Antón
- A bunch of cheetah pictures to get all those poses on paper.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconconstrict0r12:
Constrict0r12 Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Aren't cheetahs just awesome? :)
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:icontiandradrawz:
TiandraDrawz Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
OH JESUS :O O.O I LOVE IT! <3
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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks :D
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:iconcmipalaeo:
CMIPalaeo Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Great information on the extinct three - it was very helpful to find out more about the difference between the Miracinonyx species. Great artwork, as usual, of course. 
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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
Reply
:icongrisador:
grisador Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Awesome work ! :clap:


Only Cheetah is alive; unfortunately :(
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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you :D
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:icongrisador:
grisador Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2017
You're very welcome :)
Reply
:iconraptorheartthe4:
RAPTORHEARTthe4 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist
They look awesome really good but I've seen some reconstructions of the giant cheetah with no black spots even I decided to draw one raptorheartthe4.deviantart.com…

Giant cheetah (Acinonyx pardinensis)

what do you think about the idea
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wether they had spots or not isn't sure of course, but since it had a lifestyle comparable to that of modern cheetahs I find it more likely that had it had some kind of spotted pattern.

Love the perspective in your drawing :)
Reply
:iconraptorheartthe4:
RAPTORHEARTthe4 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist
Thanks I guess it might have some sort of patterns.
But something deep inside me says "i don't think the markings will look like a King Cheetah"
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Probably, but I like the king cheetah pattern so I based it on it.
Reply
:icontheterritorialtrike:
TheTerritorialTrike Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Why do you say that the American Cheetahs weren't as fast as the modern cheetah?
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
They aren't as refined as today's cheetahs.
Reply
:icontheterritorialtrike:
TheTerritorialTrike Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Okay.
Reply
:iconluca9108:
Luca9108 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Looks great!
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
Reply
:iconbh1324:
bh1324 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
I thought Miracinonyx species were larger than that.

Oh well. We did get one giant cheetah either way ;)
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The thing with the skeletal from the paper I used is that there was a scale bar that they said was 240 cm long. But that couldn't be right so I guessed it was a typo that should've been 240 mm. With that the shoulder height of M. inexpectatus was just below one meter, so basically about the same as a cheetah. For M. trumani I don't know tall it eactly was, but it could be it was indeed a bit bigger than here. 

Yeah, one giant cat is good enough :)
Reply
:iconperfectchaos22:
PerfectChaos22 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Wow, Cheetahs look like they could be domesticated if given several million years with man well....the modern one at least, IDK bout that big one....the big one isn't as fast as modern cheetahs is it?
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
They are quite easily tameable, relatively speaking. There's a reason why those rich Saoudis are driving around with one in their Lamborghinis all the time. IIRC the ancient Egyptians used them as pets for hunting, caracals too.
The big is one is slower, yes.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
Considering that house cats are barely domesticated and will try (and fail) to kill you, I doubt any cat can be domesticated to the level of a dog or even those Russian domesticated foxes.

Can you train them and work with them with reasonable (but never assured) a safety? Yes.

Domesticate them? Good luck,
Reply
:iconperfectchaos22:
PerfectChaos22 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
That's why de-clawing and neutering exists (Before you get triggered, I'm joking) also not all housecats are like that, some would never do that, it's like dogs, some are vicious and probably would try and rip their owner's throat out while some are incredibly friendly and kind
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2017
Being friendly =/= being domesticated
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:iconcamduvall:
Camduvall Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
although not officially domesticated, a lot of people in ancient times (like mid. eastern and European royalty) used tamed cheetahs like greyhounds and hunting dogs
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:iconperfectchaos22:
PerfectChaos22 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Yeah, was about to say taming and domesticating are two different things. It's still possible, well in comparison to other big cats like leopards or tigers
Reply
:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
Here's the thing about cheetahs, though: they're very hard to breed in captivity even today. While certain cultures in the Middle East and India did use  cheetahs as hunting animals, and in some cases the animals could become relatively tame, there was no real way to breed them. This is actually still an issue today, since zoos rely on captive breeding to boost the numbers of endangered species like cheetahs. 
Reply
:iconfireplume:
Fireplume Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Why call it American Mountain Cheetah when it could just be Truman's American Cheetah xD
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Because I'm bad at making up comon names xD
Reply
:icon105697:
105697 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
The top speed of the modern cheetah is actually 98 km/h. Sarah (The fastest cheetah ever clocked) broke the land speed record (which was her own record).

She completed the 100 yard dash in 5.95 seconds.

Also a cheetah can sustain this speed for 500 yards, not 300.
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Looks like I still have some awesombro numbers in my system... I thought I had gotten rid of them all xD
I'll edit it.
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017
Lol at awesomebro numbers
Reply
:iconanonymousllama428:
AnonymousLlama428 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Giant cheetah/10

Fantastic big cats. The American cheetahs are often depicted as very puma-like, due to the close relation, though, of course, people forget about the Jaguarundi...
One thing: I've noticed that cheetah cubs are born with manes. How'd it be to give the giant cheetah such a trait? It's speculation I've seen Jagroar do.
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, most reconstructions lean a bit too much on pumas imo.
I don't know if it's right what I'm saying, but I heard in a documentary once those manes of the cubs are thought to be a mimicry of honey badgers to make predators evade them. 
Jagroar's reconstruction is the best though.
Reply
:iconanonymousllama428:
AnonymousLlama428 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
I've noticed, yeah.
Oh, really? Okay, then. I was kinda influenced by Antón's Lokotunjailurus males' integument.
chasingsabretooths.wordpress.c…
Reply
:icondr-xiii:
Dr-XIII Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017   Digital Artist
They should've called Acinonyx jubatus the AFRICAN Cheetah.
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
They also live in Asia so that name isn't really valid.
Reply
:icondr-xiii:
Dr-XIII Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017   Digital Artist
So, Acinonyx jubatus should've been called the EURASIAN Cheetah?
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Not really. More like African/Eurasian cheetah, though I'm pretty sure the Asian ones are a distinct subspecies. Even the African cheetah consists out of two subspecies afaik.
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
Even discounting the fact the species is native throughout Eurasia (historically) and originated in North America (lasted long enough to meet people), there are still wild cheetahs outside Africa.

And naming a species after a drastically reduced range harms conservation (California condors are native to much of North America but aren't thought of as such partly due to their names)
Reply
:icondr-xiii:
Dr-XIII Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017   Digital Artist
Then what should've Acinonyx jubatus been called?
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
The cheetah.

Which is what we call it anyways.
Reply
:iconanonymousllama428:
AnonymousLlama428 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
There are still some Asiatic cheetahs.
Reply
:icondr-xiii:
Dr-XIII Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017   Digital Artist
The Acinonyx Jubatus Venaticus, you mean.
Reply
:iconanonymousllama428:
AnonymousLlama428 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
yup.
Reply
:icongdog00:
gdog00 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
Sadly there are 7,100 cheetahs left in the wild. Fortunately, their stronghold is Botswana.
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, it's sad. 
Reply
:iconasari13:
asari13 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
nice art
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
Reply
:iconlediblock2:
Lediblock2 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
I like the way you name prehistoric animals. Perhaps we could work together on something like this? I'm working on a project based on giving common names to various prehistoric animals, and I'd love your help with it.
Reply
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